Keynote Speeches

Challenges and Opportunities of Internet Security in Cyberspace

Jianping Wu

Tsinghua University

Abstract - Based on the Internet, the cyberspace is becoming an increasingly important environment for our life, study and work. Its security is vital to economic development, social progress and national defense. This speech, on the basis of Internet architecture, will point out that the Internet security is a very important part for Cyberspace Security, as well as one of the major technical challenges to the Internet architecture. The speech will first analyze the serious situation and major challenges of cyberspace security. Then it will indicate the possible opportunities for the development of national cyberspace during the solution of internet security. Finally the speech will particularly introduce the authenticated source address validation solution and its effect in the Internet security.

Jianping Wu

About the speaker - Jianping Wu is a Professor of Department of Computer Science at Tsinghua University and a member of Chinese Academy of Engineering. Dr. Wu is serving a chairman of the Department of Computer Science, dean of Institute for Network Sciences and Cyberspace at Tsinghua University. Dr. Wu is also serving the directors of Network Center and Technical Board of China Education and Research Network (CERNET), and the director of the National Engineering Laboratory for Next Generation Internet, a member of Advisory Committee of National Information Infrastructure for Secretariat of State Council of China, and Vice President of Internet Society of China (ISC). He is the IEEE Fellow. And Dr. Wu was also the Chairman of Asia Pacific Advanced Network (2007-2011) and received Jonathan B. Postel Service Award of ISOC in 2010.

 

Recent Advances in Machine Learning and Their Application to Networking

David Meyer

Brocade Communications Systems, Inc. 

Abstract - The recent progress of Machine Learning and Deep Learning in particular has been nothing short of spectacular. Machine learning applications now span wide variety of application spaces including perceptual tasks such as image search, object and scene recognition and captioning, voice and natural language recognition and generation, self-driving cars and automated assistants such as Siri, as well as various engineering, financial, medical and scientific applications. More generally, cutting-edge startups, established technology companies and universities are increasingly finding new, novel, and exciting ways to apply powerful machine learning tools such as neural networks to new and existing problems in many different domains and industries. The network domain, however, has been virtually untouched by all of this activity. This speech will outline recent advanced in Machine Learning with an eye towards network applications.

David Meyer

About the speaker - David Meyer is currently Chief Scientist and Fellow at Brocade Communications, where he works on future directions for Internet technologies. His current focus is the use machine learning (and in particular deep learning) for networking applications. Prior to joining Brocade, he was a Distinguished Engineer at Cisco Systems, where he also worked as a developer, architect, and visionary on future directions for Internet technologies. Most recently he served as the chair of the Technical Steering Committee of the OpenDaylight Project (where he was also the Chair of the OpenDaylight Board of Directors). He has been a member of the Internet Architecture Board (IAB) of the IETF (www.ietf.org) and the chair/co-chair of many working groups. He is also active in the operator community, where he has been a long standing member of the NANOG (www.nanog.org), RIPE, and APRICOT program committees (and served as NANOG program committee chair from 2008-2011). Mr. Meyer is also a frequent speaker at major industry and academic conferences. Mr. Meyer is also currently Director of the Advanced Network Technology Center at the University of Oregon where he is also a Senior Research Scientist in the department of Computer Science. One of his major projects at the University of Oregon is routeviews (see www.routeviews.org). Prior to joining Cisco, he served as Senior Scientist Chief Technologist and Director of IP Technology Development at Sprint.